Can a Miscarriage Affect Your Periods?

Can a Miscarriage Affect Your Periods?

Miscarriage of a pregnancy affects your body in several ways. In addition to the physical and potentially strong emotional stress of pregnancy loss, your body and reproductive system need some time to get back to normal after being pregnant.

At Serrano OBGyn Associates, Dr. Christopher V. Serrano supports you throughout the experience and aftermath of your miscarriage. Visit Dr. Serrano's San Antonio, Texas office and talk to him about what you can expect when it comes to your menstrual cycle resuming after miscarriage, as this will be unique for each situation.

The first period after a miscarriage

When you’re pregnant, your menstrual cycle ceases. You don’t release additional eggs, and you don’t bleed regularly. Spotting is possible during pregnancy, and you may experience bleeding or spotting related to miscarriage.

As your body recovers from miscarrying, your menstrual cycle eventually resumes. The timing of your first menstrual cycle postmiscarriage depends on how far you were along in your pregnancy, as well as on how regular your menstrual cycle typically is.

When to expect your first period

If your pregnancy was still in early stages, you can ovulate and restart your menstrual cycle sooner than you might think. You can ovulate as soon as two weeks after early pregnancy loss, and your period can follow shortly after.

Pregnancies that progressed further before miscarriage tend to impact your menstrual cycle more heavily. As a rule, the farther along you are, the longer it will take for your period to return.

Menstrual changes post-miscarriage

Some people notice menstrual changes after a miscarriage. Your first few periods may be noticeably different, and then return to your baseline normal after a few cycles. Or, you might notice lasting irregularity, especially after later pregnancy loss.

In the first few cycles after a miscarriage, you might experience heavier than usual flow, with more than typical clotting, discharge, or odor. You may also have lighter bleeding for a few months. Your period could last longer than usual, or be more than usually painful. You might also notice unusual tenderness in your breasts during your first post-miscarriage period.

Preparing for your period

Be prepared for emotional symptoms that might accompany the hormonal shifts around your period as it returns after a miscarriage. Miscarriage can be a very traumatic experience, and your emotions may run high, up to and including struggles with clinical depression or anxiety.

While you should anticipate some potential irregularity in your menstrual cycle after a miscarriage, too much abnormality is a good reason to consult with Dr. Serrano. Your period should restart within 2-3 months. If it hasn’t, let Dr. Serrano know. He can check for any potential health issues.

Some couples prefer to wait for a while after miscarriage, while others are eager to try again. You can become pregnant during your first postmiscarriage menstrual cycle, so talk to Dr. Serrano and your partner about your concerns, plans, goals, and gynecological health care needs around further pregnancy (or contraception).

Miscarriage affects you profoundly, and the lasting impacts, including changes to your menstrual cycle,  are challenging for many. Let Dr. Serrano help you understand, anticipate, or come to terms with the ways your miscarriage could impact your menstrual cycle, mental health, future fertility, and more.

Schedule your appointment at Serrano OBGyn Associates by calling now, or request an appointment online.

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